But I’m a Sinner!

Today’s reading is Psalm 25.

Yesterday, we recognized a connection between Psalm 24 and who may ascend the Lord’s hill and Psalm 25, this week’s psalm. But there is another connection. It is almost as if this psalm were written or placed here as a response to the previous one. Or maybe it would be better said that it is placed here to deal with an anticipated objection. According to Psalm 24, the one who has clean hands and a pure heart can climb the Lord’s hill. In Psalm 25, we have the anticipated objection. “But what about me? I’m a sinner.” Psalm 25:7 is the first explicit mention from the psalmist of his own sinfulness (Psalm 6:1 implies it; Psalm 23:3 almost implies it). It is almost as if Psalm 25 is finally expressing the objection we’ve brought up on several occasions as we’ve gone through these psalms. I do lift my soul up to the Lord. I do trust Him. But I haven’t been perfect. I’m a sinner. My hands are befouled. My heart is defiled. I want to be clean. I want to be perfect. But I’ve blown it. What now? The great news is our God is merciful. Our God forgives. Our God loves. Our God is faithful and true to His covenant. Yes, we have failed. But we can lift our soul up to our God, seek mercy and we will go away justified. Honestly, it really defies reason. I mean, I know we’ve been trained up on 2000 years of Christianity and the love and forgiveness of the sacrifice of Jesus. But if you think about it, why would anyone expect the supreme power of the universe to be loving, merciful, and forgiving? We could much more expect Him to be exacting, demanding, and unsparing. And yet, He is not what we expect. He wants us to climb His hill and He will forgive us so we can. Praise the Lord!

Tomorrow’s reading is Psalm 25.

PODCAST!!!

Click here to take about 15 minutes to listen to the Text Talk conversation between Andrew Roberts and Edwin Crozier sparked by this post!

A Word for Our Kids

Hey kids, the psalmist asks God to forget the sins of his youth. And God promises He will not remember those sins if we turn them over to Him and forsake them. However, as we have often said before and will often say again, forgiveness is not permission to sin. There is nothing in forgiveness that says sin is just okay. It isn’t okay. In fact, the cost of forgiveness is the death of Jesus. It’s amazing to know that God is not only willing to forgive us of our sins, but that He did so even though that forgiveness cost Him so much. Please, don’t take Jesus’s death lightly by taking forgiveness lightly by taking sin lightly. When you sin, turn to Jesus. He loves you and wants to forgive you. But don’t think turning to Jesus makes sin no big deal.

Author: edwincrozier

Disciple, Husband, Father, Preacher, Author. I'm convinced God's way works and would love to discuss it with you.

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