Rejoice! Rejoice! And Again, I Say, Rejoice!

Today’s reading is Psalm 35.

Psalm 35 is easily broken into three sections, three prayers if you will. The first section is vss. 1-10. The second vss. 11-18. The third vss. 19-28. Do you notice anything similar between the last verses of these sections?

Each section/prayer ends with rejoicing and praise.

This isn’t quite Psalm 33. Psalm 33 is in a time usually reserved for lament, but it is completely full of praise, rejoicing, and thanksgiving. In this week’s psalm, there is a good deal of lamenting. Yet, even the laments end with rejoicing, thanksgiving, and praise or the promise to do so when the requests are granted.

The first prayer ends with a promise of personal rejoicing and praise. The second ends with a promise to personally rejoice, praise, and give thanks among the congregation. The third invites the rest of the congregation to rejoice, praise, and give thanks along with the psalmist.

Paul tells us to give thanks in all circumstances (see 1 Thessalonians 5:18). David gives us an example of how to do just that. What can you thank God for today? What can you praise God for today? How can you rejoice today?

Tomorrow’s reading is Psalm 35.

PODCAST!!!

Click here to take about 15 minutes and listen to the Text Talk conversation between Andrew Roberts and Edwin Crozier sparked by this post.

Continue reading “Rejoice! Rejoice! And Again, I Say, Rejoice!”

Not a Bone was Broken

Today’s reading is Psalm 34.

Did you see Jesus at the end of this psalm?

He keeps all his bones; not one of them is broken.

Psalm 34:20

In John 19:36, we learn Jesus died relatively quickly on the cross. This kept the soldiers from breaking His legs. John says that was to fulfill the Scripture that says, “Not one of his bones will be broken” (ESV).

Certainly, this is part of Jesus fulfilling the Passover sacrifice (see Exodus 12:46; Numbers 9:12). Yet, Jesus is fulfilling our psalm as well.

Now, I know that sounds odd based on where we started the week. We explained that this psalm is David’s meditation on a moment when he stumbled and fell, but God delivered him anyway. Jesus didn’t stumble and fall. Why would we ever say this psalm is about Him? Good question.

The answer is very simply this. Even though David stumbled and fell, he learned how he was actually supposed to act. He used the experience to turn around and teach the coming generations how they were supposed to live. What did Jesus do? He lived that way. Where David failed, Jesus succeeded.

Jesus lived in fear of God and in wisdom. Jesus lived without deceit and without evil. Jesus sought peace and pursued it. Jesus took refuge in the Father. He committed His spirit into the hands of God. He faced many afflictions, but the Lord delivered Him from them all. And very specifically, despite all His afflictions, not a bone was broken. And because He succeeded, even though He died under Rome’s condemnation, His life was redeemed from the grave because of God’s approval and power. He was condemned by Pilate to die on the cross; He was justified (declared innocent) by God through the resurrection.

From David who failed and from Jesus who succeeded, we learn the same lesson. Trust the Lord. Take refuge in Him. Do what He says. It will be worth it in the end.

Tomorrow’s reading is Psalm 35.

PODCAST!!!

Click here to take about 15 minutes to listen to the Text Talk conversation between Andrew Roberts and Edwin Crozier sparked by this post.

Continue reading “Not a Bone was Broken”