The Living, Active Word of God

Today’s reading is Hebrews 4.

Our author encourages his audience to “strive” to enter the rest God has promised. The same word used here is employed by Paul to tell Timothy and Titus to “Do your best” (2 Timothy 2:15; 4:9, 21; Titus 3:12). It is the word Peter uses to encourage his readers to “be diligent” (2 Peter 1:10; 3:14). It’s the same word Paul uses elsewhere to talk about being “eager” (Galatians 2:10; Ephesians 4:3). In other words, we need to strive, to do our best, to be diligent, to be eager to enter the promised rest of God. We will not accidentally stumble into God’s rest. We will only get there on purpose.

However, our author’s reason for encouraging eagerness and diligence is anchored in the nature of God’s Word. God’s Word is living. It is not dead. It remains and abides (see also 2 Peter 1:23-25). It is active. That is, working. It accomplishes things. In fact, it accomplishes what God sent it to accomplish (see Isaiah 55:10-13). It is keen-edged and sharp. So sharp it can cut a dividing line between things that seem indivisible like soul and spirit, joints and marrow, thoughts and intentions. This is God’s voice and speech. His sight is also a reason to do our best. No one is hidden from Him. Even the darkest corner is bright to God (see Psalm 139:12).

The first time the term translated “word” in Hebrews 4:12 is used in this letter is Hebrews 2:2. There it is translated “message.” In that passage, the contrast was between the “word/message of angels” and the salvation declared by the Lord Jesus. Though “word/message” is not repeated, it is implied. The Lord-declared salvation is the “word” of the Lord attested by God’s Holy Spirit. The next time we find the term is in Hebrews 4:2, again translated “message.” The “message/word” is good news or gospel. The ancients had the word of God which was good news, but it did them no good because they didn’t believe it and pursue its promises. We have received good news as well, that is, the word of God. It will do us absolutely no good if we neglect and ignore it.

Specifically, our author is referring to the “word” or “message” from the Holy Spirit through David that we have as Psalm 95. That is God’s Word. He said it. It is certain. We can try to fight against it, but it is the sharpest sword we will ever face, and it will cut us down. We can try to hide from its message, but it is the brightest light and the most piercing eyes, and it will expose us before all.

Our author is essentially telling us we had better be eager to pursue God’s rest because it is certain and sure. If we neglect that salvation, that promise, that rest, all that is left us is the judgment promised by God’s Word. We won’t accidentally stumble our way in. We won’t get in because of heavenly red-tape or spiritual bureaucratic oversight. We won’t sneak past God while He’s looking some other way. There is only one way to enter God’s rest and that is based on God’s Word.

As we often say, “God’s way works.” It is the only one that does. The only way to be eager, to be diligent, to strive, to do our best to enter God’s rest is to listen to and follow God’s Word.

Are you?

Tomorrow’s reading is Hebrews 4.

PODCAST!!!

Click here to take about 15 minutes to listen to the Text Talk conversation between Andrew Roberts and Edwin Crozier sparked by this post.

Discuss the Following Questions with Your Family

  1. What are your initial reactions to the chapter and the written devo above?
  2. What are your first impressions of our author’s view of God’s Word?
  3. How should we respond to God’s Word if what our author says is true?
  4. What comfort can we take in God’s Word if what he says is true?
  5. What do you think we should pray for and about in light of this chapter and today’s post?

The New Covenant Sabbath

Today’s reading is Hebrews 4.

If I’ve heard one person say it, I’ve heard a hundred say it: “Sunday is the Christian Sabbath.” Or they’ll say the Catholics changed the Sabbath to Sunday or Constantine did. Problem is, they’re all wrong. Well…I mean, Constantine may have thought Sunday was the Sabbath, maybe even some Catholics do as well. However, no matter what anyone has thought about the Sabbath or done on the Sabbath, no one has been able to change the Sabbath.

The Sabbath is the seventh day of the week. It always has been and always will be. If you want to keep the Sabbath, you’ll have to do it on Saturday. Sunday is not the Christian Sabbath. However, very clearly, the Sabbath commandment from the Law is not part of our Christian covenant with God through Jesus Christ. We can see that from passages like Romans 14:5-6 and Colossians 2:16.

Certainly, as we read the New Testament, the first day of the week was and is a day for disciples to meet, to worship, to remember Jesus’s death and resurrection. However, the first day of the week is not the New Covenant fulfillment of the Old Testament Sabbath. Rather, there remains a Sabbath rest for the people of God. The New Covenant Sabbath is not Sunday, it is the resurrection.

On the seventh day, God rested from all His works. As the author of Hebrews builds off of that by talking about entering God’s rest, the implication is when God ceased His creative work, the plan was for man to enter into His rest. Going back to Genesis, we recognize entering God’s rest didn’t actually mean doing no work. Adam was to tend and keep the Garden. However, man sinned, was thrown out of the Garden, had to work by the sweat of his brow and in the face of thorns and thistles enduring pain to simply eat of it. Man abandoned the rest of God. As a reminder of that rest, God established the Sabbath day along with certain Sabbath weeks, festivals, and years. But in the New Covenant, Jesus is our Sabbath as He leads us to God’s rest in eternity. In Christ, we will be ushered into the rest of God. That is not just our rest from all our work. It is being in a time and place in which we are enjoying the finished and completed work of God resting in Him, with Him drinking from the River of Life, eating from the Tree of Life, never withering, prospering in all we do without pain, toil, sweat, tears.

It is not that we will do no work in eternity. It is not that eternity is lounging on clouds and eternal sun-bathing in the glory of the Lord. Like Adam, we will work. However, when we are in God’s rest we are relying so heavily on and working in such harmony with God’s completed work that what work we do will not be a toil, but a joy. Because of the curse, it is hard for us to even think of any work in that way. Perhaps the closest is that modern aphorism: “Find something you love, figure out how to get people to pay you for it, and you’ll never work a day in your life.” We are looking forward to a kind of eternal work that is so joyous, pleasant, productive, prosperous that it is rest. That is our Sabbath. That is the New Covenant Sabbath.

Christians do not keep a Sabbath day. We look forward to the eternal Sabbath rest. Let’s keep working now, though it seem toilsome, that we may enter that rest.

Tomorrow’s reading is Hebrews 4.

PODCAST!!!

Click here to take about 15 minutes to listen to the Text Talk conversation between Andrew Roberts and Edwin Crozier sparked by this post.

Discuss the Following Questions with Your Family

  1. What are your initial reactions to the chapter and the written devo above?
  2. Sunday is not the Christian Sabbath. However, based on what you know from the New Testament, what are some things all Christians should do on Sunday?
  3. What do you most look forward to regarding the eternal rest with God?
  4. How can we work today to enter into God’s Sabbath rest for His people?
  5. What do you think we should pray for and about in light of this chapter and today’s post?

David and the Holy Spirit

Today’s reading is Hebrews 4.

Back in Hebrews 3:7, the author records he is quoting the Holy Spirit in the following verses. We find his quote back in Psalm 95:6-11. The Holy Spirit was speaking in that poem/prayer. However, in Hebrews 4:7, he says it was said “through” or “in” David.

First, Psalm 95 didn’t come with an author’s heading. Be aware the author of Hebrews is telling us who the human author of Psalm 95 is: David. However, he is also telling us who the ultimate author is: the Holy Spirit. That is, though David wrote the psalm, the Holy Spirit made sure the psalm said what He wanted it to say. David, a prophet of God, was recording the Word of God.

Peter comments on this process in 2 Peter 1:20-21: “Knowing this first of all, that no prophecy of Scripture comes from someone’s own interpretation. For no prophecy was ever produced by the will of man, but men spoke from God as they were carried along by the Holy Spirit” (ESV).

When we are reading Scripture, it is true we are reading what men have recorded. They used the words they knew. They wrote from their own experiences. They had their own worldview. They had their own cultural backgrounds, personal quirks, memories. All of those things made it into their writing. However, the Holy Spirit made sure what God wanted made its way into the writing. A clarinet, a flute, and a trumpet all sound differently when played because of their different shape, material of construction, size, etc. However, they make beautiful music when the breath of a master musician is blown through them. Prophets, apostles, and writers of Scripture are much the same. Each one sounds unique. However, when the breath of God carries them along, they make beautiful Scripture.

David wrote Psalm 95 because it fit what was in his heart and mind, at the time he was writing. He wanted to encourage worship. He wanted to warn against falling away. However, the Spirit so worked with him that when he was done, this was more than David’s advice. This was the Holy Spirit’s teaching.

Keep that in mind. As we read the Bible, we aren’t just reading Paul, Peter, David, Moses, Samuel, John, Matthew, Isaiah, etc. We are reading God. We are reading the Holy Spirit. We are reading Jesus.

We should take that very seriously. Don’t you think?

Tomorrow’s reading is Hebrews 4.

PODCAST!!!

Click here to take about 15 minutes to listen to the Text Talk conversation between Andrew Roberts and Edwin Crozier sparked by this post.

Discuss the Following Questions with Your Family

  1. What are your initial reactions to the chapter and the written devo above?
  2. Why should we take Psalm 95 more seriously knowing it wasn’t simply a poem written by David, but scripture inspired by the Holy Spirit?
  3. Why does knowing it and all Scripture came from the Holy Spirit remove the idea of one’s own private interpretation as Peter spoke about?
  4. If we want to know for sure what the Holy Spirit has said, where is the best place for us to look?
  5. What do you think we should pray for and about in light of this chapter and today’s post?

“Let Us Fear”

Today’s reading is Hebrews 4.

That’s weird. I thought the repeated refrain from the Word of God was “Fear not!” But the author of Hebrews says, “Let us fear.” What’s up with that? No doubt, it is because there are things people fear that they don’t need to. However, there are things people don’t fear but need to.

We need to fear we will not reach the rest God has promised. However, this fear is not likely the fear you think of upon first hearing about it.

Pay careful attention to what happened with Israel. God delivered them from Egypt with a powerful hand and a promise to give them the land of Canaan. He told them it was theirs for the taking. He was giving it to them, in fact had already given it to them. They just had to take it. However, they didn’t believe God’s promise to give them the land. Either they failed to believe in God’s capability to deliver or in His commitment to follow through or in His care to actually protect and provide for them. Therefore, they approached the conquest as if they were on their own to take the land. When the spies brought a report back regarding how fortified the cities were and how large, powerful, and strong the land’s inhabitants were, they realized they were not able to conquer such strong people. Because they didn’t believe God was giving them the land, they were not faithful to God’s command to take the land. Therefore, they didn’t enter God’s rest. The further amazing thing is after they were rebuked and their discipline explained, they had a change of heart at the end of Numbers 14. They decided to go ahead and take the land. But Moses told them not to try since God wasn’t going with them. They tried anyway and were soundly defeated.

Most of the time, when we talk about being afraid we aren’t going to make it to heaven, we mean we are afraid we just aren’t doing enough or getting it right enough. We think we are supposed to tell people to be afraid they aren’t going to make it so they’ll try harder to be right and do more. That was not the issue. The Israelites were correct. They couldn’t do enough to conquer Canaan. There was no amount of fighting harder, trying more that was going to win them the land. Neither they, nor we are to fear we aren’t doing enough. We can’t do enough. What Israel needed to fear was not believing God’s promise. When they believed God’s promise to conquer the land, they would go take the land. When they did not believe God’s promise, they didn’t allow the promise to govern them. When we believe God’s promise to save His people, we will become His people. We will hang on to His people. When we don’t believe God’s promise, we’ll become afraid we can’t do enough, and we’ll stop doing anything.

We don’t need to develop some useless panic that we are going to obey as best we can, but not do enough and so be lost. That’s ridiculous. What we need to fear is not believing what God says and what God promises and therefore not following through with what God has asked. Certainly, part of that includes changing what God has said and doing things our way instead of His. If we believe God, we do it His way.

In other words, let us fear missing out on God’s promise enough to actually do the things God has said will lead us to the promise. For instance, Jesus said, “Whoever believes and is baptized will be saved” (Mark 16:16, ESV). Will you believe His promise? Or disbelieving, will you be unfaithful to the promise? If we can help you pursue the promise, let us know in the comments below.

Tomorrow’s reading is Hebrews 4.

PODCAST!!!

Click here to take about 15 minutes to listen to the Text Talk conversation between Andrew Roberts and Edwin Crozier sparked by this post.

Discuss the Following Questions with Your Family

  1. What are your initial reactions to the chapter and the written devo above?
  2. Are you surprised the Hebrews author tells us there is something we should fear? Why or why not?
  3. Why should we fear not entering God’s promised rest?
  4. What will this fear prompt in us?
  5. What do you think we should pray for and about in light of this chapter and today’s post?

Judgment Day Surprise

Today’s reading is Hebrews 3.

In the final paragraph of Hebrews 3, the author wants us to be surprised. You’ve heard preachers say things like, “Read that again. Notice the part we overlooked, the part we just read through without realizing how shocking it is.” The author of Hebrews is doing a similar thing here. It seems he knows his audience has gotten so used to the story of the Exodus and the Wilderness Wanderings that they might have missed a shocking point.

Who exactly died in the wilderness? Don’t miss that the people who died in the wilderness are the exact same people who were saved from and by the plagues. It is the exact same people who walked through the Red Sea on dry ground. It is the exact people who entered covenant with God at the foot of Mt. Sinai. Isn’t that surprising?

The author’s point is simply this. There are going to be judgment day surprises. That is, there are going to be people who in the final judgment will be surprised to hear they are not entering the Lord’s rest. They will be surprised because it will be some of the very people who entered covenant with God through Jesus Christ. It will be some of the very people who were delivered from their sins by the death of Jesus Christ.

Sadly, there will be those who are baptized, metaphorically going through the Red Sea or the River Jordan, who will not enter the rest of the Lord. Why? Because instead of keeping their eyes on Jesus, they drifted away. Instead of being faithful to the Lord, they became disloyal, provoking God, testing Him, rebelling against Him. They may look back to their deliverance and comfort themselves thinking all is well. They may keep hanging out with “church folk” and think they are on the same footing as the rest. The author of Hebrews tells us it doesn’t work that way. We can’t rest on our initial deliverance. We must maintain our loyalty, our faithfulness. Otherwise, we will face a judgment day surprise.

Don’t be caught off guard. Don’t be surprised in judgment. Keep your eyes on Jesus. Surround yourself with people who have permission to exhort you every day. Be loyal and faithful. Enter His rest His way.

Next week’s reading is Hebrews 4.

PODCAST!!!

Click here to take about 15 minutes to listen to the Text Talk conversation between Andrew Roberts and Edwin Crozier sparked by this post.

Discuss the Following Questions with Your Family

  1. What are your initial reactions to the chapter and the written devo above?
  2. Are you surprised when you are reminded who actually died in the wilderness? Why or why not?
  3. Why do Christians sometimes abandon their loyalty to God and rebel against Him?
  4. How can we avoid a judgment day surprise? How can we help each other avoid a judgment day surprise?
  5. What do you think we should pray for and about in light of this chapter and today’s post?

Exhort One Another Every Day

Today’s reading is Hebrews 3.

The author of Hebrews sees a great deal on the line for his readers. Their souls’ eternal destinies are on the line. They may abandon the Lord Jesus. They may let their hearts be misled by the lies of sin, becoming hardened and evil. We can imagine the writer wants to marshal as many tools in the toolbox to overcome these possibilities as he can.

However, in this particular context, he only provides one tool: “But exhort one another every day, as long as it is called ‘today’…”

WOW!!! Be amazed. Whatever else he is going to write later in the letter, his first tool is one another. The best way to keep from being deceived by sin is by surrounding ourselves with people who can see our blind spots.

Further, notice our author does not say “Exhort one another weekly as long as it is called ‘Sunday.'” Exhort one another every day. For how long are we to exhort one another every day? Until it ceases to be today.

Who do you have that is an every day relationship? Who do you have to whom you give permission to shine light on your blind spots? Who do you have that allows a reciprocal relationship of exhortation, encouragement, challenge, provocation, rebuke, reproof, instruction, discipline? If you don’t have anyone, start working on that today. In fact, you probably need more than one.

By the way, if your answer above only included biological and civil family members (especially if the only one you could think of is your spouse), may I encourage you to branch out beyond that. Fact is, family units often follow each other into sin, unbelief, and disloyalty. Find that “third party” who isn’t beholden to the biological family relationship and exhort one another every day, as long as it is called today.

Tomorrow’s reading is Hebrews 3.

PODCAST!!!

Click here to take about 15 minutes to listen to the Text Talk conversation between Andrew Roberts and Edwin Crozier sparked by this post.

Discuss the Following Questions with Your Family

  1. What are your initial reactions to the chapter and the written devo above?
  2. Why do you think the author of Hebrews homes in on the tool of one another to help us maintain faithfulness?
  3. In what ways can we exhort and encourage one another every day?
  4. What advice would you give for when we have to exhort someone in a difficult time, when sin is gaining an advantage in someone’s life?
  5. What do you think we should pray for and about in light of this chapter and today’s post?

Beware Unbelief

Today’s reading is Hebrews 3.

Though we have already hinted at it in our daily devotional writings and podcast episodes, we finally get to the point of this letter/sermon. In the first pages of this letter, we have been told about how superior Jesus is to angels and to Moses. We have been told to pay close attention to His message because of His superiority. But in Hebrews 3:12, we finally see what is motivating our author.

He is afraid these Jewish Christians will fall away from the living God. He is concerned they will be misled. However, he is not quite afraid they will be led astray by others, but by the deceitfulness of sin. He is afraid these fledgling disciples will allow their desire for sin to harden them and lead them to unbelief.

This unbelief, however, is not simply a mental denial of certain facts. Rather, notice especially Hebrews 3:18. Those who didn’t enter God’s rest were disobedient. In other words, the assessment of unbelief is not simply leveled against those who would mentally or verbally deny certain facts, it is leveled against those who do not act on those facts. It is leveled against those who do not obey. In other words, this is not merely about unbelief, but about lack of faithfulness.

No doubt, those who deny these facts will be unfaithful. However, sometimes, people mentally and verbally assert agreement with facts, but do not follow through on that agreement. They do not stay true to their assertions. While saying one thing, they do another. In other words, the author of Hebrews is not telling us that as long as we assent to some facts, we’ll enter God’s rest. He is saying we must not only mentally and verbally assent to the Lordship of Jesus, we must be faithful to it. We must obey it. Only through faithful obedience predicated on belief in the Lordship of Jesus may we enter God’s rest.

Beware unbelief. Beware disloyalty. Beware faithlessness. Pursue loyalty, fealty, faithfulness, allegiance. Believe. But not only believe, obey.

Tomorrow’s reading is Hebrews 3.

PODCAST!!!

Click here to take about 15 minutes to listen to the Text Talk conversation between Andrew Roberts and Edwin Crozier sparked by this post.

Discuss the Following Questions with Your Family

  1. What are your initial reactions to the chapter and the written devo above?
  2. How does sin deceive Christians?
  3. How can we avoid developing an evil, unbelieving heart?
  4. How can we avoid being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin?
  5. What do you think we should pray for and about in light of this chapter and today’s post?

Repeating the Sins of the Fathers

Today’s reading is Hebrews 3.

As the author of Hebrews writes to Hebrew Christians in danger of drifting away, he warns them not to repeat the sins of their fathers. He has crafted a picture that should clearly warn them all.

In Hebrews 2:14-16, he spoke of the Son helping the offspring of Abraham by delivering them from lifelong slavery through the fear of death. Surely, Hebrew Christians would catch the connection back to Moses delivering Israel from their lifelong slavery in Egypt. Now that our author has called the plagues, the Red Sea, and the Exodus to mind, he specifically compares Jesus and Moses. He becomes even more clear, citing Psalm 95 as his warning. This warning calls to mind the failures of Israel in the wilderness. They grumbled, complained, rebelled in the wilderness. Though they had seen God defeat Egypt, they did not believe He would care for them and they did not believe He would conquer Canaan. Even after delivering them from slavery, God did not let them enter His rest because of their unfaithfulness.

The author of Hebrew fears his audience is walking the same path, repeating the sins of their ancestors. He fears they, having been delivered from slavery, will test and try God by rebelling against Him. As we learned yesterday, Jesus is faithful. However, if these Christians do not maintain their faithfulness to Jesus, they will not enter the rest God has planned for them any more than that first generation of Israel entered God’s rest.

All of this is building on Hebrews 2:1-4. We must not drift away. We must keep our eyes on Jesus. We must maintain our faithfulness to Him. We must not repeat the sins of our ancestors. We must follow in the faithful footsteps of Jesus, God’s Son that we may enter into the rest He has promised us and provided by His conquest over death.

Tomorrow’s reading is Hebrews 3.

PODCAST!!!

Click here to take about 15 minutes to listen to the Text Talk conversation between Andrew Roberts and Edwin Crozier sparked by this post.

Discuss the Following Questions with Your Family

  1. What are your initial reactions to the chapter and the written devo above?
  2. Why did the Israelites abandon faithfulness to God after being delivered from Egypt?
  3. How can we be tempted to abandon faithfulness to God after being delivered from sin and death by Jesus on the cross?
  4. What advice would you give to others to grow and maintain our faithfulness to God in Jesus Christ?
  5. What do you think we should pray for and about in light of this chapter and today’s post?

Faithful in God’s House

Today’s reading is Hebrews 3.

Having made it clear Whom he is talking about, the author of Hebrews draws the reader’s attention to Jesus. “Consider Jesus,” he writes. Notice Jesus. Think about Jesus. Ponder Jesus. Meditate on Jesus. His readers have confessed Jesus. He is the apostle and high priest of their confession. But of most importance, He is faithful. He’s not just kind of faithful. He wasn’t mostly faithful. He was completely faithful. He was faithful as Moses was faithful.

Our author does more than claim faithfulness for Jesus. He provides a word picture. He is “faithful in all God’s house.” No doubt, this calls to mind how faithful Moses was in the construction of the tabernacle, the dwelling place of God. In Exodus, we read God give the instructions for the tabernacle, then we read how Moses constructed the tabernacle and it is practically an exact repeat of the instructions. Moses was faithful in the making of God’s house. In the same way, Jesus was faithful in the constructing of God’s new covenant house.

However, there is more than this word picture than a reference to the tabernacle. It is a picture of stewardship. As Joseph was the chief servant under Potiphar and then under Pharaoh, being a steward of their houses and possessions, Moses was a faithful steward in the house of God. Our author calls to mind Numbers 12:6-7. Aaron and Miriam spoke against Moses. They thought Moses was putting on airs and they wanted to be recognized as special as well. God intervened and said of Moses: “Hear my words: If there is a prophet among you, I the LORD make myself known to him in a vision; I speak with him in a dream. Not so with my servant Moses. He is faithful in all my house. With him I speak mouth to mouth, clearly, and not in riddles, and he beholds the form of the LORD” (ESV).

Consider multiple connections between this passage about Moses and what the author of Hebrews has said about Jesus. First, notice the distinction between Moses and other prophets. The beginning of Hebrews is reminiscent of this. As much as Moses surpassed all the other prophets in holy and heavenly communication, Jesus surpasses Moses. Moses was a faithful steward, Jesus was a faithful Son. But the biggest point is Aaron and Miriam were supposed to honor Moses rather than speaking against him. They were disciplined for speaking against Moses. The author of Hebrews goes on to explain “Jesus is counted worthy of more glory than Moses.” Aaron and Miriam did not honor Moses and they were disciplined. What will happen to those who do not honor the Son?

The Jews accorded Moses the greatest of honor. They viewed him as the highest of the high. No one was afforded more honor among the Jews than Moses, except God Himself. But Jesus surpasses Moses. Moses was a servant; Jesus is the Son.

What a fantastic Savior we have: Jesus Christ the Son of God. May we honor Him above all. May we be faithful to Him as He is faithful to God.

Tomorrow’s reading is Hebrews 3.

PODCAST!!!

Click here to take about 15 minutes to listen to the Text Talk conversation between Andrew Roberts and Edwin Crozier sparked by this post.

Discuss the Following Questions with Your Family

  1. What are your initial reactions to the chapter and the written devo above?
  2. How did Moses demonstrate faithfulness to God?
  3. How did Jesus demonstrate faithfulness to God?
  4. How can we demonstrate faithfulness to God?
  5. What do you think we should pray for and about in light of this chapter and today’s post?

Our Merciful and Faithful High Priest

Today’s reading is Hebrews 2.

Yesterday, we recognized Jesus became all we need Him to be as sacrifice, savior, and high priest through suffering. In Hebrews 2:17, we discover He became a merciful and faithful high priest.

Merciful. Faithful.

Did Jesus, God the Son, really have to share in flesh and blood, experience death, suffer when tempted to be merciful and faithful? Perhaps I’m wrong about this. Being God Himself, I don’t believe He lacked any intrinsic aspect of compassion or loyalty before He came to earth. However, because He left the throne of heaven and became like us, we witness His loyalty. Because He suffered at awful cost when tempted, we more readily believe He will be compassionate when we suffer. And when we grasp this, we recognize even more His mercy and faithfulness.

He didn’t go through these experiences because He had to go through them. He went through them because we needed to see Him go through them. He endured them because His enduring helps us see Him for what He is. He could have just told us He will be compassionate when we suffer in temptation. He could have just told us He would be faithful and loyal to us even if it killed Him. But He didn’t just tell us. He showed us.

In showing us, He became the completed and perfected sacrifice, savior, and high priest. He did not lack something intrinsic to be complete; we lacked something to know He is perfect. So He endured the suffering that we might know His perfection and completeness. What other kind of high priest could anyone want? How can we do anything but turn to Him when we are tempted?

Merciful and faithful. Praise the Lord!

Next week’s reading is Hebrews 3.

PODCAST!!!

Click here to take about 15 minutes to listen to the Text Talk conversation between Andrew Roberts and Edwin Crozier sparked by this post.

Discuss the Following Questions with Your Family

  1. What are your initial reactions to the chapter and the written devo above?
  2. How do you know Jesus is a merciful high priest?
  3. How do you know Jesus is a faithful high priest?
  4. How can you turn to Him for help when you are tempted?
  5. What do you think we should pray for and about in light of this chapter and today’s post?